Kasigau wildlife Corridor –
PROTECTION OF DRY FOREST AND SAVANNA IN KENYA

COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE,
CONSERVATION OF SPECIES DIVERSITY,
NEW LIFE PERSPECTIVES FOR THE LOCAL POPULATION

How do you protect around 170,000 hectares of forest with its endangered species such as lions, cheetahs, zebras and elephants? The dry forest and savanna in the Kasigau Wildlife Corridor in Kenya are important forests in the fight against global climate change. The Kasigau Wildlife Corridor climate protection project uses the mechanism of carbon financing to preserve the local forest and at the same time enable around 100,000 local people to live better.

The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya protects rare animal species such as the local elephant.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya protects rare animal species.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya helps the local population.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya helps the local population and their culture.Das Kasigau Wildlife Projekt in Kenia wird streng überwacht.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya protects rare animal species such as the elephant.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya is closely monitored by rangers.

PROJECT FACTS

The map of Africa including Kenya.

LOCATION:
Kasigau Wildlife Corridor, Kenya

PEOPLE WHO BENEFIT FROM THIS PROJECT:
ca. 100.000

PROJECT START:
1998

PROJECT DEVELOPER:
Wildlife Works

EXTERNAL VERIFIER:
Det Norske Veritas Climate Change Services AS (DNV)

QUALITY STANDARDS:
Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), CCBS Gold Level 

SIZE OF THE PROTECTED FOREST AREA:
ca. 170.000 Hektar

ANNUAL CO2-REDUCTION:
approx. 1.700.000 t CO2

PROTECTD ANIMAL SPECIES:
Elephants, lions, cheetahs, leopards, Grevy's zebras, African wild dogs, countless species of birds

PROJECT DOCUMENTATION: https://registry.verra.org/app/projectDetail/VCS/612

The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya helps the children.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya helps women.The Kasigau Wildlife Project in Kenya helps the children with their education.

Project benefits 

The Kasigau Wildlife Corridor carbon reduction project reduces the main causes of rainforest deforestation and the loss of biological diversity in the project region. This is done through extensive investments in the local communities.

  • Permanent protection of approx. 170,000 hectares of dry forest and savannah in the Kasigau Wildlife Corridor in Kenya
  • Improvement of the living conditions of the approx. 100,000 inhabitants in the project area
  • Construction of a hospital and examination of 50,000 patients per year in a new laboratory
  • In 2019, 26 classrooms were newly built or renovated
  • So far, 7,379 scholarships have been awarded, 2 school kitchens and sanitary facilities have been built 
  • Comprehensive environmental education in communities and schools is offered
  • A program against water scarcity for humans, animals and nature was set up
  • Gender equality: new jobs for 1,200 women were created (making clothes, soaps, baskets)
  • 350 new jobs were created in tree nurseries, educational and health facilities or as rangers
  • Protection of biodiversity in two national parks
  • Successful fight against illegal elephant hunting

Contribution to the UN sustainability goals

These are the goals of the United Nations in the area of sustainability.

Project background

How do you actually protect 170,000 hectares of forest? The Kasigau project is about dry forest and savannah in the wildlife corridor that connects the Tsavo East and Tsavo West nature parks in Kenya. Endangered species such as lions, zebras and cheetahs as well as countless species of birds live here. During the seasonal migration, 2,000 African elephants cross the area every day.

However, this forest area is characterized by massive deforestation and slash and burn. In order to protect the Kasigau Wildlife Corridor, more than 100 rangers were trained in the local population to guard and defend the area. Additional income opportunities are needed for the local population in order to curb the overexploitation of nature. That is why the project creates jobs in factories and small companies.

This project was named the best global climate protection project in Environmental Finance’s 8th Voluntary Carbon Market Ranking 2017.

How does climate action work with forest protection?

Forests are among the most important carbon sinks on the planet, are home to an enormous variety of species and are the basis of life for many people. However, the global forest areas have declined sharply in recent decades due to increasing settlement, agricultural use, illegal deforestation and increased resource extraction.

Forest protection projects like the one in Kasigau ensure that forests are preserved in the long term and that the protection of the forest is more valuable than its deforestation. In addition, forest protection projects create alternative sources of income and educational opportunities.

Depending on the project region, forests store different amounts of carbon per hectare. A particularly large amount of carbon is stored in the vegetation and soil of tropical swamp forests, primary rainforests and mangroves.

Project Quality standards

This is the Verra Verified Carbon Standard logo.

VCS – Verified Carbon Standard 

The Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) is the leading global standard for the certification of emission reductions from forest protection projects. These emission reductions must be real, measurable, permanent, additional, checked by independent third parties and calculated conservatively.

This is the logo of the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards (CCBS) from Verra.

Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards

The Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards (CCBS) examine the effects of climate protection projects on the climate, biodiversity and human rights. The CCBS do not have their own methodology for calculating emission reductions, as they are only used in combination with the VCS.